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Arboretum
"A man does not plant a tree for himself, he plants it for posterity." - Alexander Smith   
White Oak
(Quercus alba)

Donated by Ed and Pam Chaney
Tree Map Location: # 53
In Memory of Edwin and Geneva Chaney

White Oak tree White Oak leaf White Oak bark White Oak acorn


Leaf: Alternate, simple, oblong to ovate in shape, 4 to 7 inches long; 7 to 10 rounded, finger-like lobes, sinus depth varies from deep to shallow, apex is rounded and the base is wedge-shaped, green to blue-green above and whitish below.  
Flower: Monoecious; male flowers are yellow-green, borne in naked, slender catkins, 2 to 4 inches long; female flowers are reddish green and appear as very small single spikes; appearing with the leaves in mid-spring.  
Fruit: Ovoid to oblong acorn, cap is warty and bowl-shaped, covers 1/4 of the fruit; cap always detaches at maturity; matures in one growing season in the early fall.  
Twig: Red-brown to somewhat gray, even a bit purple at times, hairless and often shiny; multiple terminal buds are red-brown, small, rounded (globose) and hairless.  
Bark: Whitish or ashy gray, varying from scaly on smaller stems to irregularly platy or blocky on large stems. On older trees smooth patches are not uncommon.  
Form: A very large tree; when open grown, white oaks have rugged, irregular crowns that are wide spreading, with a stocky bole. In the forest crowns are upright and oval with trees reaching up to 100 feet tall and several feet in diameter.  
Source: College of Natural Resource Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University  
Website: http://www.cnr.vt.edu/dendro

To participate in the Kaskaskia College Arboretum please contact:
Office of Institutional Advancement
618-545-3069
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