Kaskaskia College Course Syllabus

ENGL 101

 

IAI C1 900

 

 

    I.  COURSE LOCATION

            X         ON CAMPUS                 CCC    

 

   II.  COURSE IDENTIFICATION

        PREFIX: ENGL              NUMBER: 101            NAME: English Composition I

 

3          LECTURE HOURS               LIBA 04900                CURRICULUM & NO.

0          LABORATORY HOURS     1.1/230401                  PCS-CIPS NUMBER

3          CREDIT HOURS                              N                     VARIABLE (Y/N)     

0          CLINICAL HOURS                            N                     REPEATABLE (Y/N)

0          SOE HOURS                                      0                      TIMES

 

 

  III.  DIVISION TO WHICH COURSE IS ASSIGNED

            X         BACCALAUREATE/TRANSFER

                        CAREER EDUCATION

                        CONTINUING COMMUNITY EDUCATION

                        ABE/ASE

                        HEALTH OCCUPATIONS

                        OTHER

 

   IV.  CATALOG DESCRIPTION OF COURSE

English 101 is an expository essay writing course. This course (1) develops awareness of the writing process; (2) provides inventional, organizational and editorial strategies;

(3) stresses the variety of uses for writing; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in reading, thinking and writing.

   

    V.  PREREQUISITES FOR THE COURSE

            1. ACT English score of 18 or better.

            2. Qualifying COMPASS English Placement Score, or

            3. A “C” in English 100

           

   VI.  METHODS OF INSTRUCTION

            X         DISCUSSION-LECTURE                            SEMINAR

                        LABORATORY                                              TELE-LECTURE (FILM-TV)

                        CORRESPONDENCE                                            LABORATORY-DISCUSSION

                        TELEVISION (TELECOURSE)                      LECTURE

                        RADIO                                                            LECTURE-LABORATORY

                        INDEPENDENT STUDY                               OTHER (IDENTIFY):

                        CO-OP                      

  VII.  OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE (USE ADDITIONAL PAGES AS NECESSARY)

  • comprehend, analyze, and critique a variety of texts including academic discourse
  • use various invention, drafting, and revising/ editing strategies depending upon the purpose of the writing, the materials available to the writer, and the length of time available for the task
  • engage a topic in which the writer explores writing as a means of self-discovery and produces a text that is designed to persuade the reader of the writer's commitment
  • demonstrate a theoretical understanding of rhetorical context (that is, how reader, writer, language, and subject matter interact)
  • establish a voice appropriate to the topic selected and the rhetorical situation
  • clarify major aims, arrange material to support aims, and provide sufficient materials to satisfy expectations of readers
  • demonstrate satisfactory control over the conventions of edited American English and competently attend to the elements of presentation (including layout, format, and printing)
  • recognize the existence of discourse communities with their different conventions and forms

 

 VIII.  A.  REQUIRED TEXTBOOK(S)

 

        TITLE: Strategies for Successful Writing:  A Rhetoric, Research Guide, Reader, and Handbook

        AUTHOR (S): Reinking, James A, and Robert von der Osten

        COPYRIGHT DATE: 2007                  EDITION: 8th

        PUBLISHING COMPANY: Pearson Prentice Hall

       

 

   IX.  SUPPLEMENTARY INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS IDENTIFY GENERAL SOURCES:

            Any pocket dictionary.

            Paperback novels at the teacher’s discretion

        

        IF EXTENSIVE COLLATERAL READINGS ARE REQUIRED FROM SPECIFIC

        BOOKS, PROVIDE INFORMATION.

 

    X.  METHODS OF EVALUATION OF STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE COURSE

           At least 70% of the course grade must be based on essay writing; essays must total 5000 words. Writing assignments should be specified in terms of total points possible and the number of words required.

The remaining percentage of the grade may be based on a combination of quizzes, tests, and a final examination. The final examination is required.

       

     XI.  COURSE OUTLINE

    

            I.  Principles of Composition

                        A.  Choosing and restricting a topic

                        B.  Audience, tone, point of view, and purpose

C.  Topic and thesis sentences

                        D.  Outlining

                                    1.  Topic outline

                                    2.  Sentence outline

                        E.  Creating effective sentences

                                    1.  Standard sentences

                                    2.  Parallel sentences

                                    3.  Periodic sentences

4.      Balanced sentences

                        F.  Creating effective paragraphs

                                    1.  Outlining a single paragraph

                                    2.  Characteristics of an effective paragraph

                                                a.  Completeness

                                                b.  Unity

                                                c.  Order

                                                d.  Coherence

                                    3.  Paragraph development

                                    4.  Continuity techniques

                                    5.  Paragraph types and uses

                                                a.  Introductory

                                                b.  Developmental

                                                c.  Concluding

                                                d.  Explanatory

                                                e.  Transitional

                        G.  Style

                                    1.  Choosing effective vocabulary

                                    2.  Figurative speech

                                    3.  Levels of usage

                        H.  Revision

    

        II.  The Essay

    

In arranging class assignments, the instructor should remember that this course emphasizes expository essay writing; thus narrative (“creative” writing) and personal writing (journals) should be de-emphasized.  However, because we also realize that some students may need personal experience to support most of their claims, teacher discretion is important.  The instructor should remember, however, that personal writing is of little use in English 102, and if this course is to prepare students for 102, then the emphasis must be on the more objective rhetorical modes.

 

One uncompromisable requirement is that students will write 5000  words--for most instructors five to  eight essays.

    

(If the instructor chooses to structure a course around the traditional rhetorical modes, he or she is encouraged to choose from the following: critical analysis comparison/contrast, classification, definition, process analysis, problem/solution, cause/effect, argument (developed fully in English 102).

 

NOTE:  As part of the Kaskaskia College comprehensive Assessment Program for Communications all students in English 101 will take a pre- and post-test focusing on elements of composition.  Furthermore, all instructors are asked to participate in our department assessment plan. Currently, we are reflecting upon how to improve our courses and student learning by completing a form that lists some of the assessment techniques utilized at both the summative and formative levels; the form also allows for an explanation of how assessment data will be used to make changes to the course the next time that it is taught.  The grading standards/ rubric and the assessment form are attached.

    

PREPARED BY:

 

REVIEW/REVISION DATE:

 

REVIEWED BY:


 

Freshman Composition—English 101

 

Learning Outcome I:

 

Students should be able to write effective sentences in Standard English demonstrating correct grammar, mechanics, and punctuation.

More specifically, they should be able to do the following:

 

1. Recognize major sentence errors: sentence fragment, comma splices, run-on sentences, and fused sentences.

 

2. Use correct subject-verb agreement in all sentence formats.

 

3. Vary sentence styles between simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex formats.

 

4. Recognize and avoid dangling and misplaced modifiers.

 

5. Master Standard-English vocabulary and word choices.

 

6. Eliminate slang, jargon, idiomatic phrases, and colloquial expressions.

 

7. Demonstrate proper punctuation patterns by correctly using commas, semicolons, colons, dashes, quotation marks, underlining, and end marks.

 

8. Use proper capitalization.

 

9. Use correct pronoun-antecedent agreement while avoiding sexist language.

 

10. Eliminate wordiness and padding from sentences.

 

11. Avoid first-person and second-person points-of-view.

 

 

Learning Outcome II:

 

Students should be able to write effective introductory paragraphs.

More specifically, the students should be able to do the following:

 

1. Compose an introduction that catches the reader's attention, leads into the thesis sentence, and announces the tone of the essay.

 

2. Construct a thesis sentence that provides one controlling idea for the entire essay.

 

3. Construct a thesis sentence that clearly states the writer's opinion or stand.

 

4. Write an essay map or declarative sentence that leads the reader into the body or supporting paragraphs of the essay.

 

5. Avoid first and second person pronouns in thesis.

 

Learning Outcome III:

 

Students should be able to construct effective body paragraphs demonstrating clear topic sentences, unity, completeness, order, and coherence.

More specifically, the students should be able to do the following:

 

1. Write topic sentences that support the thesis of the essay and announce and control the subject matter of the paragraph.

 

2. Compose body paragraphs that are unified in one major point.

 

3. Construct paragraphs that are developed completely and use specific details to create images in the reader's mind.

 

4. Order sentences within the paragraphs, displaying a knowledge of inductive, deductive, chronological, and spatial orders.

 

5. Develop paragraphs conforming to narrative, descriptive, example, comparison, contrast, classification, definition, and causal analysis modes.

 

6. Establish coherence in paragraph construction by using internal transitions, pronouns, and conjunctive adverbs.

 

7. Avoid repetitious and redundant sentences, clauses, phrases, and words in the paragraph.

 

8. Expand vocabulary usage to the college level.

 

Learning Outcome IV:

 

Students should be able to compose effective concluding paragraphs.

More specifically, students should be able to do the following:

 

1. Compose concluding paragraphs that summarize the major points of the essay and provide clear endings to the paper.

 

2. Avoid introducing new points in a conclusion.

 

3. Avoid predictable, useless phrases such as "in conclusion."

 

Learning Outcome V:

 

Students should be able to compose expository essays of at least 625 words in an objective, third person point-of-view.

More specifically, the students should be able to do the following:

 

1. Write an essay that clearly displays a relationship between introductory, supporting, and concluding paragraphs.

 

2. Employ transitions between major thoughts.

 

3. Recognize audience, purpose, message, style, and tone as the controlling factors of expository essay.

 

4. Learn and develop a personal writing process including an invention strategy, such as brainstorming or free-writing.

 

5. Construct proper and effective outlines to be submitted with the essays.

 

6. Develop close proofreading skills.

 

7. Use a word processing application to compose essays.

 

8. Select mature subjects for exposition.

 

9. Recognize the importance of revision.

 


English Department

COMPOSITION GRADING STANDARDS

While appreciating the individualism inherent in the essay grading process, the department adheres to the holistic method of evaluating essays and expects consideration of content, structure, and mechanics. The following standards in grading are designed to establish uniformity among all teachers of Composition:

EXCELLENT ESSAY --A

Content-- The content of the A essay exhibits a mature level of thought with a clearly stated thesis and abundant support in the forms of concrete examples, details, and reasoning. The essay addresses the specified audience and the assigned rhetorical mode.

 

StructureIt is structured with a complete introduction, graceful transitions through supporting paragraphs, and a fitting conclusion.

 

MechanicsMechanically, the paper employs a variety of sentence structures, precise word choice, and figures of speech to create a clear tone; it is void of repetition, wordiness, and colloquialisms.

GOOD ESSAY-- B

Content-- The B essay has a clearly stated thesis; the supporting paragraphs exhibit adequate examples and details with clear reasoning. The essay addresses the specified audience and the assigned rhetorical mode.

 

Structure-- The structure displays an introduction, clear transitions, and an acceptable conclusion. If not highly impactful, it has few structural weaknesses.

 

Mechanics-- The paper's mechanics consist of a variety of sentence structures and accurate word choices; it has few errors in Standard English. However, a mere absence of errors should not be rewarded with a grade of 6-.

AVERAGE ESSAY--C

Content-- The average essay has a clearly stated thesis; however, it is often trite or general. It attempts to display examples and details, but fails to provoke thought. The essay fails to address the specified audience, but it does reflect the assigned rhetorical mode.

 

Structure-- The structure presents a beginning, middle, and end, but lacks transitions. It has few structural weaknesses, but oftentimes structure is its 9nly strength.

Mechanics--Sentence structures are not varied and are often repetitive; unique word choices are not apparent. Errors in Standard English are commonplace; however, the essay does not have major sentence errors, such as comma splices, fragments, and run-ons.

 

POOR ESSAY--D

ContentThe poor essay lacks a clearly stated thesis.  It fails to display examples and details, but instead the paragraphs are filled with repeated generalities.  The essay fails to address the specified audience, and oftentimes it does not even reflect the assigned rhetorical mode.

StructureThe structure presents a beginning, middle, and end, but lacks transitions.  The body paragraphs show little unity, order, or coherence.

Mechanics—Sentence structures are mostly simple and most sentences restate the previous thought; simple word choices ("their"and"its") are incorrect and confused. The most flagrant errors in Standard English are prevalent.  Most seriously, a few comma splices, fragments, and run-ons remain uncorrected.

 

FAILING ESSAY—F

 

ContentThis essay lacks a clearly stated thesis.  It fails to display examples and details, but instead the paragraphs are filled with repeated generalities.  The essay fails to address the specified audience, and oftentimes it does not even reflect the assigned rhetorical mode.

StructureThe structure fails to present a beginning, middle, and end.  The body paragraphs do not show unity, order, or coherence.

Mechanics—Sentence structures are mostly simple and most sentences restate the previous thought; simple word choices ("their"and"its") are incorrect and confused. The most flagrant errors in Standard English are prevalent.  Most seriously, many comma splices, fragments, and run-ons remain uncorrected.

Failure to eliminate comma splices, fragments, and run-ons from any essay should constitute a failing grade for the assignment.


Faculty Assessment Form

For Learning Outcomes

 

 

Faculty Name ____

Semester:  Fall/ Spring/ Summer         Year: ______

 

Course:  _ _______

 

General Assessment Strategies

 

Measurable course objectives on syllabus (pick any two):

 

#1 

 

 

#2

 

 

How were these course objectives assessed?

 

#1

 

 

#2

 

 

What results did you note and what changes will you make the next time you teach this course based on the results of these assessment tools?

 

 

 

Faculty

Form A


Classroom Assessment Techniques (CAT’s)

 

Specific strategies for assessment of learning outcomes and for daily or weekly improvement of student learning.

 

 

What were a few CAT’s utilized this semester for specific Learning Outcomes?  List outcome and CAT:

 

#1.

 

 

#2.

 

 

#3.

 

 

What were some of the most significant results that you received this semester?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What changes would you make the next time you teach this course as a result of a CAT?

 

 

Faculty

Form B

Faculty Evaluation Form of The Implementation of CAT’s and Assessment Techniques

 

Faculty Name ______________________

 

Semester:  Fall/ Spring/ Summer                 Year:  ____________

 

Course:  _________________________   Date last taught _________________

 

 

 

The last time you taught this course you answered the following questions concerning general assessment strategies on Form A and specific CAT’s on Form B: 

 

“What changes will you make the next time you teach this course based on the results of these assessment tools?”                     

 

and

 

“What changes would you make the next time you teach this course as a result of a CAT?”

 

Please state some of your changes that you implemented:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please summarize the results of your changes:

 

 

 

 

 

What changes will you make the next time you teach this course based on the results of these changes in your assessment strategies and what new CAT’s will you implement because of these changes?

 

 

Faculty

Form C